Blog Post 5 – SOLID Principles

When developing software, creating understandable, readable, and testable code is not just a nice thing to do, but it is a necessity. This is because having clean code that could be reviewed and worked on by other developers is an essential part of the development process. When it comes to object oriented programming languages, there are a few design principles that help you avoid design smells and messy code. These principles are known as the SOLID principles. These principles were originally introduced by Robert J. Martin back in 2000. SOLID is an acronym for five object oriented design principles. These principles are:

  1. Single Responsibility Principle – A class should have one and only one reason to change, meaning that a class should have only one job. This principle helps keep code consistent and it makes version control easier.
  2. Open Closed Principle – Objects or entities should be open for extension but closed for modification. This means that we should only add new functionality to the code, but not modify existing code. This is usually done through abstraction. This principle helps avoid creating bugs in the code.
  3. Liskov Substitution Principle – Let q(x) be a property provable about objects of x of type T. Then q(y) should be provable for objects y of type S where S is a subtype of T. This means that subclasses can substitute their base class. This is expected because subclasses should inherit everything from their parent class. They just extend the parent class, they never narrow it down. This principle also helps us avoid bugs.
  4. Interface Segregation Principle – A client should never be forced to implement an interface that it doesn’t use, or clients shouldn’t be forced to depend on methods they do not use. This principle helps keeps the code flexible and extendable.
  5. Dependency Inversion Principle – Entities must depend on abstractions, not on concretions. It states that the high-level module must not depend on the low-level module, but they should depend on abstractions. This means that dependencies should be reorganized to depend on abstract classes rather than concrete classes. Doing so would help keep our class open for extension. This principle helps us stay organized as well as help implement the Open Closed Principle.

These design principles act as a framework that helps developers write cleaner, more legible code that allows for easier maintenance and easier collaboration. The SOLID principles should always be followed because they are best practices, and they help developers avoid design smells in their code, which will in turn help avoid technical debt.

https://www.digitalocean.com/community/conceptual_articles/s-o-l-i-d-the-first-five-principles-of-object-oriented-design#single-responsibility-principle

https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/solid-principles-explained-in-plain-english/

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